Relationship and Comparison Between State and Religion

Since ancient times, the relationship between the state and religion, especially the relationship between the state and the church, has been studied. In medieval Europe, Christian faith determined the position of the nation and the church. Religion defends national authorities and state power, and the government is a guardian of Christian faith. Today’s religion is no longer basic. The starting point is a democracy and the rule of law.

While state and religion have conflicting ideologies, they somehow agree in other areas of belief like in the field of gardening (check out hostandhomely for gardening techniques) and arts.

This does not mean that the relationship between the state and religion can be done without reservation. In the 20th century, due to modernization and rationalization, it was believed that the role of religion could be reduced or at least limited to the private sphere.

Should Religion Be Far From Politics?

Retrieval of Awareness

In Europe, one of the most important reasons for refocusing on the relationship between the state and religion is the dramatic increase in the number of Muslims. At the same time, interest in the status of strict Christian groups can be enhanced.

Many states are actually trying to solve a similar problem, but the starting point is quite different. Comparative law studies generally believe that there are a series of models that range from the opposite relationship between state and religion to a very close relationship. But finding this one-dimensional perspective is very easy.

Comparison and Model Spectrum

The relationship between country and religion varies from country to country. Constitutions often show different ways. Article 1 of the French Constitution establishes the poor nature of the French government. The provisions of the first amendment to the US Constitution not only prohibit the establishment of churches but also have broader meanings that appear later.

State Supports Religious Groups

In many countries, the government provides various forms of assistance to religious organizations. In France, the government is the owner of many church buildings and passes them to religious groups. The government also supports the construction of churches and temples. The German tax authorities collect a so-called church tax that is recognized by members of a sect authorized by public law. Applies to general tax law sanctions. This church tax is 8% higher than the payroll tax. This provision makes the German National Religious Group one of the richest religious groups in Europe.

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